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In the words of the French artist Henri Matisse, “An artist is an explorer.” Whether that exploration begins with formal art education in the classroom, spontaneous sketching in a travel journal, experimenting in your studio, or by merely noticing the flora and fauna around them, many art quilters are known to be deeply moved by nature. Today we’ll be exploring that link between the art we create and the environment in which we live
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Smarter” manufacturing control systems are needed to cope with the increased use of outsourced production and multi-product facilities, according to new research. The study, by Sagnik Mitra, a doctoral researcher, and Ganti S. Murthy, PhD, professor, at the Indian Institute of Technology in Indore, examined whether established process control technologies are a good fit for modern biopharmaceutical
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Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) engineers, working in collaboration with scientists at Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, have developed a new way to grow pancreatic “organoids”—tiny replicas of the pancreas—from either healthy or cancerous pancreatic cells. Using a specialized synthetic hydrogel scaffold to mimic the extracellular environment, the researchers were able to grow tiny pancreatic
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Inspired by the natural bonding between a class of potent local anesthetics called site-1 sodium channel blockers (S1SCBs) and peptide sequences on the sodium channel in the nerve cell membrane, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, have developed a self-assembling delivery system that releases the anesthetic over a prolonged period. S1SCBs such
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Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. To diagnose dementia, doctors first assess whether a person has an underlying, potentially treatable, condition that may relate to cognitive difficulties. A physical exam may be performed to measure blood pressure and
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A clinical trial conducted at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center found that high-dose cytarabine followed by subsequent immunotherapy treatment with pembrolizumab benefited patients with resistant or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a highly aggressive cancer. The findings (“Phase II Trial of Pembrolizumab after
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Humanigen is vowing to continue pursuing approvals for lenzilumab following the FDA’s rejection of its application for emergency use authorization (EUA) of the antibody as a treatment for patients hospitalized with COVID-19—a setback that has sent the company’s stock plunging more than 50%. The FDA stated in a letter that it was unable to conclude
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Scanning electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria being engulfed by a neutrophil [National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health] Research has found that, similar to a spider trapping its prey, the immune system’s neutrophil and macrophage cells can cooperate to capture and “eat” bacteria. Researchers at the Vanderbilt Institute
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GeneQuine Biotherapeutics, a German biotech company focused on the development of gene therapy for musculoskeletal disorders, contracted Belgium-based Exothera, a CDMO, to conduct a feasibility study for the development of a large-scale manufacturing process aor its osteoarthritis gene therapy product candidate GQ-303 in the scale-X™ fixed-bed bioreactor. GeneQuine is developing GQ-303, its intraarticular gene therapy
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Differences between microbiome species and genes in children from different regions of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) may affect the release of cyanide after poorly processed cassava is consumed, and impact on development of the neurological disorder konzo, according to a study in 180 children, carried out by Children’s National Hospital researchers. Konzo—a severe,
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University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine scientists report a major advance in understanding the way our bodies ensure the proper functioning of mitochondria. The findings could open the door to better treatments for many common diseases, including Alzheimer’s and diabetes, according to Zhen Yan, PhD, and colleagues, who describe (“Mitochondria-localized AMPK responds to local
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International quilting sensation, Lynette Anderson shares her hand embroidery stitchery, paper piecing and appliqué techniques in this five lesson online course. Follow along as Lynette uses these techniques to create her beautiful Forest Floor Table Runner. The table runner pattern will be included with the course purchase. The project is perfect for anyone looking to learn or
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On Thursday, September 30, 2021, a significant milestone will be reached: we’ll be taping the 500th episode of “Love of Quilting “with co-hosts Sara Gallegos and Angela Huffman. And we’ve decided to invite you to join us as a live studio audience…From your home, using Zoom! Unlike other broadcast studios, our set in Golden, Colorado,
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Cytiva officials say the company continues to expand its manufacturing capacity for bioprocessing single-use consumables in China. In collaboration with Wego Pharmaceutical in the country, the two firms are expanding an existing facility jointly launched in 2018. These newly added manufacturing lines will triple the supply capacity of single-use consumables in the Asia-Pacific region, according
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Flash Therapeutics, a gene therapy CDMO that develops and produces DNA and RNA transfer technologies, reports that it is accelerating the ramp-up of its biomanufacturing capabilities. This will allow the Toulouse, France-based company to position itself for the production of large-scale clinical batches, including both integrative DNA and RNA technologies (its proprietary LentiFlash® technology), according to
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New research shows proteinaceous foam that forms nests of the túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus), a native of Trinidad, can encapsulate a variety of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds and release them steadily over long periods, providing an improved drug delivery system that could help to combat the rise of antimicrobial resistance. The results were published this
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Despite advancements in treating wounds, the molecular mechanisms behind wound healing is not fully understood. Now, researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), have identified a new molecular pathway that promotes wound healing in the skin. Their findings could even play a role in nonhealing wounds. Their findings are published in the journal JCI
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